SuSanA - Forum Kunena Site Syndication http://www.forum.susana.org/ Wed, 02 Sep 2015 08:30:51 +0000 Kunena 1.6 http://www.forum.susana.org/components/com_kunena/template/default/images/icons/rss.png SuSanA - Forum http://www.forum.susana.org/ en-gb Re: Theme II: Prioritising those most in need (Thematic Discussion on Sustainable Development Goals) - by: GrahamK http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/201-theme-2--prioritising-those-most-in-need/14725-theme-ii-prioritising-those-most-in-need-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14781 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/201-theme-2--prioritising-those-most-in-need/14725-theme-ii-prioritising-those-most-in-need-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14781 What does “Prioritising those most in need” really mean?

For me we should be talkng about helping those on $1 a day or less but that does not seem to be the case – not really! So far as I can see help is no longer given to those who cannot afford to buy 'products'!!
Am I wrong? Really? It seems to be USA and UK government policy
Otherwise projects on, for example, improving latrines would be a top priority but what happens is that such projects get abandoned when it is realised that no-one if going to pay for such improvements.

In 2012 two projects were being developed to modify existing latrines and convert the manure into protein.
Just what is needed, you might think, for millions across the rural world but what happened next?
It was deemed that they had to “create a product that’s commercially viable” !
How crazy and how typical of many projects creating a device only needed by the very poor and then expecting them to buy it – with what?
Visit
blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/sanitationventures/inn...let-design-workshop/]]>
Theme 2 – Prioritising those most in need Wed, 02 Sep 2015 08:21:27 +0000
Re: Theme IV: Safe versus basic sanitation (Thematic Discussion on Sustainable Development Goals) - by: joeturner http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/203-theme-4--safe-versus-basic-sanitation/14727-theme-iv-safe-versus-basic-sanitation-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14780 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/203-theme-4--safe-versus-basic-sanitation/14727-theme-iv-safe-versus-basic-sanitation-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14780
The proposed new core indicator of ‘percentage of population using safely managed sanitation services’ comprises three main elements:


  • a basic sanitation facility (MDG ‘improved’ indicator)
  • which is not shared, and
  • where excreta are safely disposed in situ or transported and treated off-site.


So it appears that shared sanitation systems have been ruled out from the proposed indicators.

We've had a discussion about some of these points on the forum before: forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-su...and-mdg-implications]]>
Theme 4 – Safe versus basic sanitation Wed, 02 Sep 2015 07:46:25 +0000
Re: Theme III: Civil society's role in monitoring (Thematic Discussion on Sustainable Development Goals) - by: LucyStevens http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/202-theme-3--civil-societys-role-in-monitoring/14726-theme-iii-civil-societys-role-in-monitoring-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14779 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/202-theme-3--civil-societys-role-in-monitoring/14726-theme-iii-civil-societys-role-in-monitoring-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14779
I really hope the answer is yes - because slum communities themselves are doing increasing amounts of work on enumerations, and at lower levels of detail, many NGOs are developing maps and surveys of slums where they are working.

The problem, however, is that it is hard to integrate these findings with DHS or census results because they are not representative samples and might not apply a standard set of questions. And this leaves us with the age-old problem that slum communities remain under-represented and un-seen in large survey findings, and the huge issue of the inequalities between slum communities Vs the rest of the city remain obscured.

On another topic, I am curious about overlaps between definitions of 'safe' water and 'safely managed' sanitation in targets 6.1 and 6.2, and the measures of waste water and water quality in 6.3. What is different about what will be monitored in 6.3? Is it that here we will be looking at the down-stream effects of what is happening at household levels?

Thanks, Lucy]]>
Theme 3 – Civil society’s role in monitoring Wed, 02 Sep 2015 07:45:12 +0000
Re: hard-to-reach indigenous groups and WASH - by: joeturner http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14772-hard-to-reach-indigenous-groups-and-wash#14778 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14772-hard-to-reach-indigenous-groups-and-wash#14778
I wonder if any has a thought about whether the increased focus on WASH in the SDGs will help with any of that? Will it make any difference to these marginalised communities?]]>
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global sanitation indicators, JMP monitoring Wed, 02 Sep 2015 07:39:39 +0000
Re: Theme IV: Safe versus basic sanitation (Thematic Discussion on Sustainable Development Goals) - by: LucyStevens http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/203-theme-4--safe-versus-basic-sanitation/14727-theme-iv-safe-versus-basic-sanitation-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14777 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/203-theme-4--safe-versus-basic-sanitation/14727-theme-iv-safe-versus-basic-sanitation-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14777 basic sanitation for all as the priority - and safe sanitation for as many as possible. This implies that the sector should avoid investing in safe sanitation for some at the cost of basic sanitation for all and a progressive reduction of the equality gap between the rich and poor in access to basic sanitation.

But will the indicators as currently phrased provide the necessary incentives for that? Or should we be recommending revised indicators to capture this nuance?

Also, where are we at in terms of SHARED sanitation. My understanding was that it did not count, but in some crowded urban contexts it is the only option. Where it is, for example, managed by a small group of households, or for tenants all living on the same plot, it can be OK. There is quite a difference between this and public shared toilets (the pay as you go sort), or those which are located at markets / other community spaces.

Thanks, Lucy]]>
Theme 4 – Safe versus basic sanitation Wed, 02 Sep 2015 07:35:19 +0000
Re: hard-to-reach indigenous groups and WASH - by: canaday http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14772-hard-to-reach-indigenous-groups-and-wash#14776 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14772-hard-to-reach-indigenous-groups-and-wash#14776
I have been building UDDTs with indigenous people here in Ecuador for over 15 years. In fact, I got started with UDDTs because we needed one at a house my wife and I had bought... and my wife is an indigenous Shuar woman.

I have built with a variety of ethnic groups, but mostly with the Achuar people, with whom we have built over 50 UDDTs in recent years, in partnership with various projects that are working with theses communities.

I think it is key to teach indigenous people about EcoSan. They are getting all sorts of stuff from Western Society, but let's try to not get them on the bandwagon with the most ridiculous parts of Western Society, like defecating via pipes into other people's drinking water (with or without treatment).

Getting people to change their sanitary habits is an imminently cultural endeavor, so we need to be culturally sensitive and do lots of consciousness-raising and follow-up. Like everyone else, indigenous people need to see that these alternatives work and gradually start to apply them in their communities. This process need to include people who know each culture, together with members of each culture.

I also think it is key to work in places, like Bhutan, that are just opening up to Western culture before the wasteful flush toilets get installed on a big scale. In many cases, they were living fairly idyllic lives before Western germs got in, so it is logical that we should them fight these germs.

Hopefully the upper-strategies you mention will help the indigenous people everywhere.

Best wishes,
Chris Canaday]]>
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global sanitation indicators, JMP monitoring Wed, 02 Sep 2015 02:31:14 +0000
Re: Menstruation management and Santiation systems - by: Nancy http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/24-menstrual-hygiene-management-mhm/14720-menstruation-management-and-santiation-systems#14775 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/24-menstrual-hygiene-management-mhm/14720-menstruation-management-and-santiation-systems#14775
What a great article! I've shared it through social media - such important topics, both of which need much more attention in terms of impact on each other. I'm attaching a link to PATH's WASH website where we have posted a number of outputs from our work with Vivian Hoffmann/University of Maryland and partners including SEI on menstrual management and sanitation systems. sites.path.org/water/menstrual-hygiene-m...agement-resources-2/

There are so many issues that are not often considered, as you point out. The lack of consideration for how to contain and then finally dispose of used menstrual hygiene products is one. With more women and girls using disposable pads, appropriate systems and awareness-raising will be very much needed. Reusable products offer an important option though different types of products are needed for different contexts of use and users. We've just completed a landscape of menstrual cups, of which there are many! We expect to share the findings early next year. It's fascinating to see studies showing their use and acceptability among women and adolescents in a number of low-resource settings. We are considering approaches that might address some of the barriers to use.

Best wishes,
Nancy]]>
Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) Tue, 01 Sep 2015 22:54:44 +0000
Re: Social Impact Bonds / Development Impact Bonds - by: jonpar http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/164-financing-supply-and-demand-side-costs/14409-social-impact-bonds#14774 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/164-financing-supply-and-demand-side-costs/14409-social-impact-bonds#14774
To date this is the most comprehensive document that I have come across on the topic of social impact bonds in relation to their application to the WASH sector - or as applied in the development sector, these are known as Development Impact Bonds (DIBs).

Development Financing for Tangible Results: A Paradigm Shift to Impact Investing and
Outcome Models - The Case of Sanitation in Asia
www.unescap.org/resources/development-fi...g-and-outcome-models

This provides a good summary of what SIBs/DIBs are (see p.35):

Social impact bonds/Development Impact Bonds utilizes a contingent return model in which the return is a function of the tangible outcome created: the higher the social impact is, the higher the financial return to the investor. In this sense, it actually is more like equity: the higher the social impact is, the higher the internal rate of return.

• The government (or corporate player) offers a contingent payment to the investor based on the savings or benefit that will be created by a social sector intervention. In turn, the investor invests in the social sector intervention with his/her return determined by how quickly and effectively that social intervention delivers social impact. The quicker the delivery is, the higher the return, thus incentivizing innovation.

• The private sector capital market bears the capital risk. The government or corporate
player only pays out on the basis of tangible social outcome (see section 4.2.2). The
implementing organization (the social entrepreneur or civil society) has access to longterm
funding and does not have to spend its limited resources in fund-raising.

There is some more relevant information located here :
www.wateronline.com/doc/development-impa...te-partnerships-0001

... and in the document:

Innovative Financing for Development: Scalable Business Models that Produce Economic, Social, and Environmental Outcomes - download from www.globaldevincubator.org/wp-content/up...-for-Development.pdf you will find a schematic illustrating cash flows associated with a Development Impact Bond - see page 19 - Figure 17.

If this has caught your attention and then you might be interested to download and look at these documents in more detail.]]>
Financing (supply- and demand-side), costs Tue, 01 Sep 2015 22:39:40 +0000
EU Water Facility Urban Sanitation Project Coordinator - Liberia (INT1769) - Deadline September 10th 2015 - by: jonpar http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/20-jobs-consultancies-internships/14773-eu-water-facility-urban-sanitation-project-coordinator-liberia-int1769-deadline-september-10th-2015#14773 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/20-jobs-consultancies-internships/14773-eu-water-facility-urban-sanitation-project-coordinator-liberia-int1769-deadline-september-10th-2015#14773
Liberia (INT1769) - Deadline September 10th 2015

jobs.oxfam.org.uk/vacancy/eu-water-facil...69/3042/description/

Oxfam in West Africa has an exciting opportunity for someone to coordinate the Consortium’s EU Water Facility Urban Sanitation Project in Liberia.

Oxfam is looking to recruit a Project Coordinator to ensure proper implementation and grant coordination of the EU Water Facility Urban Sanitation Project as per the proposal, log frame and implementation plan; and ensuring the timely compilation of progress reports from consortium members.

S/he will be planning and executing of training needs assessment and technical capacity building of project staff and partners. The Project Coordinator will ensure compliance of the EU Water Facility Urban Sanitation Project with the donor requirements and lead agency’s (Oxfam) internal guidelines.

JOB PURPOSE: The purpose of this position is to ensure proper implementation and grant
coordination of the EU Water Facility Urban Sanitation Project as per the proposal, log frame
and implementation plan; and ensuring the timely compilation of progress reports from
consortium members. S/he will be planning and executing of training needs assessment and
technical capacity building of project staff and partners. The Project Coordinator will ensure
compliance of the EU Water Facility Urban Sanitation Project with the donor requirements and
lead agency’s (Oxfam) internal guidelines.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
 Take lead in coordinating implementation of all project deliverables from project inception to
project closure as agreed in the project documents
 Take lead in the development of programme annual and quarterly work plans
 Provide leadership for smooth implementation of planned project activities in collaboration
with project staff of the member and partner agencies and in line with the approved budgets
 Coordinate the operations of project managers to ensure adherence to agreed common
approaches and reporting requirements, harmonisation of approaches and undertake regular
planned action to increase visibility of the Project
 Identify programme staff training needs and initiate appropriate intervention to address the
capacity gaps
 Review project progress reports submitted by the partners and compile consortium
programme progress reports
 Ensure timely submission of Donor quarterly reports in collaboration with the technical and
finance and logistics working groups
 Ensure timely budgetary revisions and timely disbursements at member and at partner
level
 Be responsible for timely communication with the programme staff in the field offices on
project milestones and upcoming deadlines
 Keep the Consortium Coordinator, Board and Project Steering Committee Team informed
about all programmatic issues of relevance to the overall management and coordination of
the project
 Monitor project activities through periodic field visits
 Maintain up to date project information
 Coordinate various baseline and post implementation surveys as planned
 Recommend revisions (if necessary) to planned project activities and budgets to the
Consortium Coordinator
 Participate in technical working groups to ensure harmonised technical approaches and input]]>
Jobs, consultancies, internships Tue, 01 Sep 2015 21:27:07 +0000
hard-to-reach indigenous groups and WASH - by: joeturner http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14772-hard-to-reach-indigenous-groups-and-wash#14772 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14772-hard-to-reach-indigenous-groups-and-wash#14772
Does anyone have experience running a WASH project particularly targeting a marginalised indigenous group? Are there specific technical issues relating to delivering to those groups and do you think that the SDG focus on leaving nobody behind will make a difference to project delivery on the ground for these groups? Maybe there will be more money available to delivering to these groups than there has been before?]]>
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global sanitation indicators, JMP monitoring Tue, 01 Sep 2015 19:05:15 +0000
Ghana: Sanitation and Water in Small Towns and Rural Areas (SAWiSTRA) Programme (Community Water and Sanitation Agency, Ghana) - by: Theodora http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/142-government-as-a-driver/14771-ghana-sanitation-and-water-in-small-towns-and-rural-areas-sawistra-programme-community-water-and-sanitation-agency-ghana#14771 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/142-government-as-a-driver/14771-ghana-sanitation-and-water-in-small-towns-and-rural-areas-sawistra-programme-community-water-and-sanitation-agency-ghana#14771
We are a public sector organization and operate under the policy direction of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing. We were established by an act of parliament in 1996:
"An Act to establish a Community Water and Sanitation Agency to facilitate the provision of safe water and related sanitation services to rural communities and to provide for connected purposes." (see on our website here: www.cwsa.gov.gh/cwsa_select.cfm?corpnews_catid=3)

Here are the details of the project (funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation):

Title of grant: Ghana: Sanitation and Water in Small Towns and Rural Areas (SAWiSTRA) Programme

  • Subtitle: Supporting the Development of a Sustainable Approach to Faecal Sludge Management
  • Name of lead organization: Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA)
  • Primary contact at lead organization: Theodora Adomako-Adjei, Extension Services Coordinator, Community Water & Sanitation Agency, Head Office
  • Grantee location: Accra, Ghana
  • Developing country where the research is being tested: Ghana
  • Start and end date: June 2014 - December 2018
  • Grant type: Other (Building Demand for Sanitation (BDS) portfolio, integrated implementation and learning initiatives
  • Grant size in USD: $8,648,407 as per grant database here

Short description of the project:

The purpose of the project is to assist rural communities and small towns in four regions (Western, Central, Eastern and Volta ) in Ghana to have access to safe sanitation and drastically reduce open defecation.

The FSM study is underway and should provide an overview of existing public and private options used by households, institutions and public facilities. The study includes a review of national policy and strategy, as well as management, business, and operating models for fecal sludge collection, transportation, treatment and disposal or re-use. The results are expected in September 2015 and will be used by CWSA to pilot sanitation options and associated FSM practices for institutions (such as schools and clinics) and public places (such as markets and bus stops). A national FSM strategy will be developed on the basis of the study and pilot results.

Goal(s):

To assist rural communities and small towns in four regions in Ghana to have access to safe sanitation and drastically reduce open defecation

Objectives:
  • Identify technical options and management models for fecal sludge management (for transport, safe disposal or reuse) in small towns and rural areas.
  • Develop a strategy for safe reuse and decentralized treatment options to form the basis for further scale-up of these options

Research or implementation partners: The French government (AFD) and the
European Investment Bank (EIB) were meant to provide loads but the loans were cancelled

Links, further readings – results to date:

Our website: www.cwsa.gov.gh

Documents in SuSanA library (one poster so far):
www.susana.org/en/resources/library/details/2198

Summary description in BDS report of BMGF attached below.

Current state of affairs:
This project was originally designed to establish an innovations unit at CWSA, to support a € 80 million sanitation and water supply program for small towns and rural areas, financed through loans from the French government (AFD) and the European Investment Bank (EIB). The Foundation grant was restructured with an initial grant of $500,200 when the loan was canceled. The planned feasibility study of technical options for Fecal Sludge Management (FSM) in small towns and rural areas has moved forward. Possible next steps depend on the results of the study.

Biggest successes so far: None yet

Main challenges / frustration: N/A

Please don't hesitate to ask if you have questions about this project.

Regards,
Theodora


Theodora Adomako-Adjei
Extension Services Coordinator
Community Water & Sanitation Agency, Head Office
Private Mail Bag
KIA. Accra. Ghana.]]>
Government as a driver Tue, 01 Sep 2015 17:56:42 +0000
Don't delay, raise a hand for hygiene today! - by: WASHanna http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14770-dont-delay-raise-a-hand-for-hygiene-today#14770 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/182-sustainable-development-goals-sdgs-global-sanitation-indicators-jmp-monitoring/14770-dont-delay-raise-a-hand-for-hygiene-today#14770 bit.ly/hygieneSDG.

The deadline for expressing your interest is Friday, September 4, so don't delay!]]>
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global sanitation indicators, JMP monitoring Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:55:00 +0000
Hygiene indicator in SDGs - by: WASHanna http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/14769-hygiene-indicator-in-sdgs#14769 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/92-nutrition-and-wash/14769-hygiene-indicator-in-sdgs#14769
Please consider co-signing our response to the IAEG indicator consultation. More information is available here: bit.ly/hygieneSDG.

The deadline for expressing your interest is Friday, September 4, so don't delay!]]>
Nutrition and WASH Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:41:18 +0000
Re: Theme III: Civil society's role in monitoring (Thematic Discussion on Sustainable Development Goals) - by: WASHanna http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/202-theme-3--civil-societys-role-in-monitoring/14726-theme-iii-civil-societys-role-in-monitoring-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14768 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/202-theme-3--civil-societys-role-in-monitoring/14726-theme-iii-civil-societys-role-in-monitoring-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14768
I am grateful for the opportunity to participate in this discussion, and gauging by the conversations that have already begun I think it will be a lively one!

I think that Graham does a good job outlining the challenge. As I see it we indeed are facing a critical time in not only WASH, but global development writ large. The SDG process has been more extensive, more inclusive, and more aspirational than the MDG process. This is good, but it also means that the important work of implementation will also require more energy, resources, and collaboration. Ultimately, we will need to know that as a global community we are fulfilling the commitments that we have made in the SDGs and monitoring is the process by which this will occur.

Monitoring is essential because without it we won't know the full extent of the situation and progress made. Monitoring is the process by which governments will be held responsible for their commitments.

There are currently two "levels" of indicators proposed. The first consists of global indicators, which all countries would report on. My organization, the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing (PPPHW), for instance, is advocating for hygiene to be measured as a global indicator. [You can, and should, join us in doing this! More info is here: bit.ly/hygieneSDG]. The second level consists of local or regional indicators. These would be selected by countries and tailored to their context.

Civil society, from my perspective, has a few roles to play in monitoring the SDGs. For instance, as the PPPHW is doing, we can advocate for the right global indicators. We can identify and promote good optional indicators. Also, implementing organizations can make current data more readily available to policymakers.

I look forward to hearing your thoughts and engaging with you all on this topic over the next two weeks.]]>
Theme 3 – Civil society’s role in monitoring Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:20:28 +0000
Re: Theme IV: Safe versus basic sanitation (Thematic Discussion on Sustainable Development Goals) - by: eddyperez http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/203-theme-4--safe-versus-basic-sanitation/14727-theme-iv-safe-versus-basic-sanitation-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14767 http://www.forum.susana.org/forum/categories/203-theme-4--safe-versus-basic-sanitation/14727-theme-iv-safe-versus-basic-sanitation-thematic-discussion-on-sustainable-development-goals#14767
Thanks for pointing out some of the inconsistencies of the document that JMP prepared. Attached is another JMP document that goes more into the details of the indicators. This note provides a more distinct definition for each rung of the sanitation ladder. Please keep in mind that some of the wording in these documents come from the political process of the member states and as such, some of the finer technical points have gotten a bit blurry in the documents. The top level documents talk about adequate sanitation but that terminology is not being used in the more technical definitions of the wrung on the ladder. Please also note that at the end of the day, each country will adapt these goals, targets to what they think is best.

But the core principle remains the same: basic sanitation for all as the priority - and safe sanitation for as many as possible. This implies that the sector should avoid investing in safe sanitation for some at the cost of basic sanitation for all and a progressive reduction of the equality gap between the rich and poor in access to basic sanitation.

Eddy]]>
Theme 4 – Safe versus basic sanitation Tue, 01 Sep 2015 14:50:55 +0000